Bowhunter Bags Record-breaking Elk in Montana

Believed to have taken the largest elk recorded in the country in 48 years

BOZEMAN — A Montana bowhunter is believed to have taken the largest elk recorded in the country in 48 years.

The Bozeman Daily Chronicle reports that Montana hunter Steve Felix bagged a bull elk on public land early in hunting season that was scored a 430 by the Boone and Crockett Club and Pope & Young Club, groups that keep world hunting records.

By comparison, the current world record typical American elk has a score of 442-5/8 and was taken by a rifle. The second and third largest elk were both taken prior to the year 1900. The current largest typical elk ever taken with a bow is scored a 412-1/8.

Animal trophies are scored based on the distances between key points on the rack as well as the number of points on each antler.

  • Concerned Citizen

    That’s nice, now the bull will no longer produce offspring, which, truncates the quality of all future bull elk. Those record bulls should only be shot with a camera.

    • RockyMountainHunter47

      A 400+ in bull can be 10 years old and most likely had his opportunity to breed with lots of cows and produce many calf’s with his gene pool. However that makes little difference what is more important is what he eats. I can look back some 60+ years of sheds and clearly see a difference in antler growth. Pre 90s deer and elk were capable of growing huge antlers even at a young age and it’s all because of the abundance of food. More food allows for better antler growth and the reason is because of greater timber harvest. The man deserve props especially since he did it on public land and that’s a far greater achievement then what you will ever muster.

      • Concerned Citizen

        Do you believe that killing animals specifically for their antlers is ethical?

        • RockyMountainHunter47

          If it’s public land he is more interested in the challenge of the hunt and the meat then the trophy. Trophy hunting is when you pay 10k to shoot a selected bull on a private ranch such as Ted Turner’s 2 million acre ranch and blocks public access to millions of public land by abusing the corner crossing loop hole.

          • Concerned Citizen

            I have hunted on Turners ranch. I got to meet him while out on the hunt one day. He seemed like a really nice guy. He had a massive bull in his herd that “no one is allowed to hunt”. He said it was to preserve his genetic line. So, do you think he knows something?

          • RockyMountainHunter47

            He knows that a rich client will pay 10 to 15k to shoot a bull like that. He also knows he’s blocking access to public land for his own financial gain by blocking federal land to the public but allowing his clients to shoot bulls off that very same public land.

  • geraldcuvillier

    Concerned citizen has no idea about what it takes to even get close to an animal like that. I would venture that this man has been watching this animal for years.

    • RockyMountainHunter47

      Agreed I have been hunting for well over a decade and I still have not taken an elk here in NW Montana. Hunting public land elk is tough and even tougher to bag a 400+ bull. I bet this guy did put in a lot of time in to connect with that elk. Concerned Citizen has no filter and has no respect for other peoples life style.

      • Concerned Citizen

        You are both very wrong. I have been a bow hunter for almost 30 years. I am not a fan of hunting just for the biggest antlered anything. I have always hunted responsibly, albeit mostly for the meat. I have hunted with (and know of more), people who have left a dead deer or elk on the ground because the antlers didn’t score high enough. In retrospect, or if it ever happens again, I would turn them in to the department of fish and game. However, one of the guys was my best friend. I have not hunted with him since that day. How many more hunters do that? I think “antler fever” causes more hunter waste than we know about. It is an ethics issue, and it is happening.
        The biggest white tail I have ever seen (including in photos) was standing in my back yard. I could have easily shot it and had the “trophy”, but I already had enough meat. Not many hunters would do that IMHO.
        I believe trophy hunters have caused a decline in antler quality over the years, and as more and more people hunt (mainly for the antlers) it will get worse.
        “A 400+ in bull can be 10 years old….”
        A large antlered animal does not have to be 10 years old to carry it’s genetic (and protein induced) antlers. They can be big, and be no more than a few years old. Also, just food will NOT produce big antlers, however, it will allow for bigger antlers. Genetics are a huge factor (pun intended).
        Finally, “Concerned Citizen has no filter and has no respect for other peoples life style.” NOT true. I am concerned however, that I might find you in MY hunting area! Hahaha!

        • RockyMountainHunter47

          Being an avid sportsman I put in my home work when it comes to deer and elk and the science leans more towards the food quality and quantity that will help determine antler growth, genetics was a decade ago regardless some private hunting companies do shoot deer based on genetics to increase possible trophy potential. If you have been bow hunting for almost 30 years then your original comment to would not reflect a veteran hunter.

          • Concerned Citizen

            “your original comment does not reflect a that of a veteran hunter.”
            I disagree, my comment represents an opinion derived from being a veteran hunter.

          • RockyMountainHunter47

            The way you ecspress your opinions I am highly doubtful.

  • montanaeasy56

    Wow! Congratulations