In Focus: Ammo Art

Turning ammunition into art

By Greg Lindstrom
Jenn Mayrand creates spent round jewelry in her shop in Creston. Greg Lindstrom | Flathead Beacon

Jenn Mayrand does not consider herself an artist. But her ammunition art and jewelry business, Badass Babe, has become so popular in just one year that she is currently producing 100 pieces per day in preparation for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation’s Hunter and Outdoor Christmas Expo in Las Vegas, a 10-day event that attracts about 200,000 people.

“It’ll be a huge learning experience and a kick in the pants no matter what,” said Mayrand.

She began making jewelry – everything from earrings to cuff links – just over a year ago. She cuts the head case off a spent cartridge, grinds the brass to smooth the rough edges, and then incorporates it into her pieces.

Mayrand wasn’t afraid of failure when she jumped into this new venture. She decided, “I’m going to do what I want to do. I’m going to call it what I want to call it. If people don’t like it, if it doesn’t go anywhere, then it doesn’t go anywhere. But I wanted this to be what I wanted it to be.”

Jenn Mayrand creates spent round jewelry in her shop in Creston. Greg Lindstrom | Flathead Beacon
Jenn Mayrand creates spent round jewelry in her shop in Creston. Greg Lindstrom | Flathead Beacon

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