Opinion

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Letter

Memorial Day Message in Bad Taste

Day should not to be used as a campaign promotion

I normally don’t watch the news in the morning, but while at home on the May 28 holiday waiting for Mr. Coffee, I turned on the TV and started the day with President Donald Trump’s Memorial Day message on Twitter. He is the president and commander in chief, and should be respected, but when I read his message, I think he stooped to a new low of decorum and regard for the office.

His tweet more or less acknowledged the sacrifice of our fallen warriors (which is expected and appropriate), but then goes on that their sacrifice was not in vain and they would be proud because of our great economy and the low unemployment of blacks and Hispanics! Not bad things at all, but I found that self-serving comment absolutely repugnant in the context of the true meaning of Memorial Day: remembrance of those who served and gave their lives to our nation and what it means to all of us today.

It’s ironic that Trump constantly tries to throw the Constitution out the window, especially the First Amendment, as it suits him. Just for starters, he attempted to censor his critics on Twitter, but that was recently ruled illegal by a New York judge. Also recently, Trump denied NFL football players their right to protest, calling on “owners” to hide them in the locker room before the game. Personally I don’t care for “taking a knee” during the National Anthem, but I think it’s a good thing they can do so if they so choose, to express themselves peaceably and legally. It might take some extreme imagination, but can you even think what would have happened to German athletes if they “took a knee” during their anthem in the 1936 Olympics to protest Hitler’s atrocities to date? About 400,000 Americans gave their lives in WWII to save the world from the tyrants of the day, and protect our right to be free; not to be used as a campaign promotion on this somber day of commemoration in 2018.

Tom Horelick
Libby

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