Opinion

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Business Is Personal

Looking For Work?

People love to refer work, so make it as easy as possible to refer you.

I recently had conversations with a few different people about their need to find additional work and / or find additional clients. Some are software people, but others are in less well defined areas (soft skills, in at least one case). There seems to be no shortage of folks who are tense about where their next client is coming from, or their next gig. You might be in that situation or know someone who is. Let’s discuss a few topics that will help people know you’re taking on new clients, and also to help them point the right work in your direction.

Looking for *what* work?

When people mention that they’re looking for new clients or additional work, they often assume that everyone knows exactly what they do and for whom. This often isn’t the case. In many situations, the work and the money are substantially different for work that seems (to most) like “the same work”.

Take concrete work. You might specialize in concrete finish work, foundations, and footings. If so, it might be safe for people who know you to keep their eyes open for gigs that require concrete work, specifically involving new construction.

On the other hand, if you do “mudjacking“, you’re still likely working with concrete, but the skills and equipment needed to do your work are different from that of more mainstream concrete work. You’d be in demand from a different group of people (existing building owners vs. owners / general contractors doing new construction and additions). Seems obvious to you, but keep in mind that few people know and understand your business like you do. Be sure not to leave assumptions open.

We do concrete floors, foundations, slabs, and footings” is much different than “we help people whose foundations have major damage from cracks, shifting, and settling“, even though both involve concrete. You want to make it easier for people to notice and refer you for opportunities that fit the work you want to do.

What’s your ideal work?

Let’s refine that last thought a bit more. It’ll help people notice an opportunity for you if they know what you do. It could make a big difference if they know the kind of situation where your work shines. “I know a guy who does concrete” starts a different conversation than “I know someone who specializes in fixing that“.

The second answer is only likely to come up in conversation if you consistently make it clear what your superpower is. The fact that you have this superpower doesn’t mean you’re the only one with it. Nor does it mean that you’re the best in the world at it. It simply means that someone who needs the kind of work we’re talking about will be getting one of the best if they find you. It’s the kind of work you prefer, the kind you’re one of the best at, and the kind that you’d choose if and when you have a choice.

How do you make that clear? Be explicit about it in your advertising, in your email signature, on your truck, and in any mention of your business. I mention email signature because they’re present every time you email, regardless of the reason. I like is Dean Jackson’s “When you’re ready” technique.

Dean uses a short blurb at the end of his emails after his name, sometimes as a PS. It’s so simple that anyone can use it. “Whenever you’re ready, here are three or four ways I can help:” followed by simple statements of those ways. Not everyone is ready when they see an email from him, but every email is a low-pressure reminder that leaves no doubt how he can help when they are ready.

Who’s your ideal client?

It helps to get specific about your ideal client & the ideal situation for your help. It isn’t difficult to find companies struggling with team / manager issues, but “I work with companies who managers and teams who need help” doesn’t help us help you. Do you “fix” management teams? Do you help owners whose staff is unmotivated? Clarity is essential.

Everyone knows a company or family that needs some help, or has a problem to solve. People love to refer work, so make it as easy as possible to refer you – particularly when you’re the ideal match.

Want to learn more about Mark or ask him to write about a strategic, operations or marketing problem? See Mark’s site, contact him on LinkedIn or Twitter, or email him at mriffey@flatheadbeacon.com.